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Our View

UPDATED since original post thanks to picture sent in from Wayne

Well I finally got round to sorting out a panaramic view from our balcony, and the first thing that I have learnt is that stitching together 9 images is too many, and that the subject matter in this case is probably too big.

AND I know the horizon could be straighter etc but it was an experiment. I reckon that it shows off the entirety of our view pretty well which was the main objective!

panaramicviewwtmk.jpg

If you want to see the picture in its full glory then you can download it here OR Just Added – check out the Photo below sent in by Wayne!

taylor-science-experiment-3.jpg

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15 Comments

  1. Not bad for an experiment! πŸ™‚

    Did you use your tripod for this, or were these shots made hand-held?

    Do the Nikons come with stitching software (like the Canons do) or did you do this in something else, like Photoshop?

  2. I hope that you don’t mind me offering a couple of suggestions. (I love making panoramic shots myself, so I’ve got a few under my belt.)

    It’s really worthwhile making sure you’ve got the head of the tripod level, so that as the camera rotates it stays level. The wider your panorama, the more a tilted horizon shows. (You might be able to rotate your stitched image in Photoshop and then crop it. This will depend, to an extent, how much “spare” space you’ve got top and bottom…)

    If you use a wider lens (ie a shorter focal length) such as your Sigma 10-20 at the long end, you’ll get the same span in fewer shots – ie there will be less stitching to be done later. That would also give you more foreground/sky which could be cropped later in Photoshop, which might be particularly useful if you’re having to rotate the horizon and then crop it. There are various pros and cons, but if your experimenting hasn’t extending to that lens yet, you might find it worth trying.

  3. Suggest away πŸ™‚

    The tripod was level, and I straightend the image in Photoshop, just not well enough!

    I nearly used the 10-20 but thought it may put too much ‘distance’ into the shot, but I will try it next time!

    I reckon I have a few good opportunities to practice looking around the marina here πŸ™‚

  4. Oh sure, I suppose it’s OK if you like that sort of thing. You know, a beautiful scene of an exotic land in a nice warm arid climate next to the ocean. Just don’t worry about the rest of us in the frigid climates with snow coming up to your waist. πŸ˜‰

    Is there any way of attaching pictures on our posts?

  5. ?? What are you going on about? I don’t hate you! πŸ™‚

    No, I’ve got your photo stretched out on my 2 24″ screens. You can actually see the details. So I was going to take a picture of my 2 monitors and show you what it looks like.

  6. I know you love me really πŸ™‚ You just hate the fact that I live in the sun!

    Go ahead 2 monitor picture will be really cool. Send it over and I will sort something out with it.

    Cheers

  7. > I nearly used the 10-20 but thought it may put too much Γ’β‚¬ΛœdistanceÒ€ℒ into the shot, but I will try it next time!

    Well, while you’re simply experimenting at home, that’s the time to try it and see if you were right about the distance. Rather than driving 150 miles and not being sure…

    The last time I recall shooting a stitched set, I used the 20mm end of the Sigma lens. However, I was somewhat closer to my landscape than you seem to be here.

    Don’t forget, you can always trim the top/bottom of the stitched image in Photoshop to remove the effect of ‘distance’. It will depend what you’re planning to do with the final result. Are you planning to get it printed out large scale (hi-res) and stick it on your wall? Or are you planning to to use a reduced size version on the web?

    Like I said earlier – there are pros and cons…

  8. Speaking of the Sigma 10-20 – I’ve just remembered this panoramic shot I took this time last year across Rannoch Moor. It was a single frame, shot at the wide end of the zoom and cropped top/bottom.

    I couldn’t use this for a large print, but it works fine for on-screen delivery. (Click the Flickr “All Sizes” link to see what I mean…)

  9. @Gary – Very nice! I think that works really well because it isn’t so ‘busy’ compared to mine. To be honest if I was looking for a great picture I wouldn’t choose what I used, but as I wanted to show the whole view as I keep banging on about it to everyone I had no choice really πŸ™‚

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