iDropper – The Electronic Self-addressed Stamped Envelope

It took me a while to get to grips with iDropper $49 but once I did I found that I really liked it.iDropper Box.jpg

What is it?

“iDropperTM is an FTP file transfer system in two parts: The iDropper application, and the uploader client “droplets” which it creates. You can distribute the droplets (Mac or Windows) to anyone you wish, or use them on your own desktop.

A droplet is a mini-application that sits on the computer desktop as an icon. Once a droplet is configured, FTP file transfer is accomplished simply by dragging files and folders onto the desktop icon. End users require no knowledge of FTP protocols, do not need to install and configure an FTP client, and NEVER need to know your FTP login and password information.

It’s like giving users an electronic self-addressed, stamped envelope!”

To see how it works it really does make sense to view their screenshots page.

“iDropper works by creating a “droplet”, which is an entirely self-contained FTP client that points to a particular folder on an FTP server. This droplet has all the FTP host name, login and password information embedded in it. The user of the droplet requires no knowledge of FTP, no login, and no password. He simply drags and drops files onto the droplet, and they are delivered. See the diagram below for an illustration of the basic workflow:

BasicWorkflow.jpg

In this basic process, an Administrator uses iDropper to configure a droplet. The Administrator then distributes the droplet to the End User via e-mail. The End User then installs the droplet on his desktop. Once the droplet is installed the End User simply drags and drops files and/or folders onto the droplet. The droplet connects to the server via FTP and the files are uploaded to the folder chosen by the Administrator. The Administrator then retrieves the files from the server.

But that’s not all. Where iDropper truly excels is after file delivery. Droplets can be configured to send you an E-mail message after the delivery, so you know when files have been uploaded to your server.

You can configure your droplet to send the user to a Web Page after the upload is complete. This could be a special confirmation/acknowledgement page, or simply your company home page.

Droplets can also collect information about the job (Job Info) and deliver that information along with the files. You can create a custom form that is presented to the end-user when files are ready to be uploaded. The form will be transmitted in XML or plain text format (your choice) along with the files.”

I have shared this detail verbatim with you because it is really important that you read it, understand it, but don’t get put off by it. That is what nearly happened to me! Whilst I am not specifically in their target market:

“iDropper is not limited to the printing and prepress industry. iDropper is also well suited for creative services agencies, magazine and newspaper publishing, software developers, geographically distributed workgroups, and anybody who makes or receives frequent FTP uploads.”

I do use FTP a reasonable amount and have been continually frustrated with the level of repetitiveness that the options I have tried to date seem to necessitate.

I recently upgraded a number of WordPress blogs and I found the droplets speeded up the process. I am in the process of designing and populating a blog for a non-technical Windows user and I have found iDropper a very efficient means of sending and receiving the data and content files that they have and I need, and vice versa when I have required their input.

So from a position of doubt and uncertainty I found an efficient and effective use for iDropper – I hope you do as well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.